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Neurotoxicology. 2012 Oct;33(5):947-71. doi: 10.1016/j.neuro.2012.05.011. Epub 2012 May 22.

Pesticide exposure and Parkinson's disease: epidemiological evidence of association.

Author information

1
National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, 21041-210 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. cfreire@ugr.es

Abstract

It has been suggested that exposure to pesticides might be involved in the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). We conducted an updated systematic review of the epidemiologic literature over the past decade on the relationship between pesticide exposure and PD, using the MEDLINE database. Despite methodological differences, a significantly increased PD risk was observed in 13 out of 23 case-control studies that considered overall exposure to pesticides (risk estimates of 1.1-2.4) and in 10 out of 12 studies using other research designs (risk estimates of 2 or higher). Various studies found stronger associations in genetically susceptible individuals. Among a growing number of studies on the effects of exposure to specific pesticides (n=20), an increased PD risk has been associated with insecticides, especially chlorpyrifos and organochlorines, in six studies (odds ratios of 1.8-4.4), and with the herbicide paraquat, the fungicide maneb or the combination of both. Findings considerably strengthen the evidence that exposure to pesticides in well water may contribute to PD, whereas studies of farming and rural residence found inconsistent or little association with the disease. Taken together, this comprehensive set of results suggests that the hypothesis of an association between pesticide exposure and PD cannot be ruled out. However, inadequate data on consistent responses to exposure hinder the establishment of a causal relationship with PD. Given the extensive worldwide use of many pesticides, further studies are warranted in larger populations that include detailed quantitative data on exposure and determination of genetic polymorphisms.

PMID:
22627180
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuro.2012.05.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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