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Dig Liver Dis. 2012 Sep;44(9):748-53. Epub 2012 May 22.

Overutilization of post-polypectomy surveillance colonoscopy in clinical practice: a prospective, multicentre study.

Author information

1
Gastroenterology Unit, Valduce Hospital, Como, Italy. francoradaelli@virgilio.it

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although the adherence to post-polipectomy recommendations is advocated as a quality indicator of colonoscopy programmes, prospective data on actual use of surveillance are lacking.

AIM:

To evaluate the appropriateness of post-polypectomy surveillance colonoscopy on a community-wide basis and to identify factors associated with it.

METHODS:

Data on consecutive post-polypectomy surveillance examinations performed over a 4-week period in 29 Italian endoscopy units were collected. The time interval between index and surveillance colonoscopy was calculated and compared to guidelines recommendations. Determinants of surveillance timing appropriateness were assessed by logistic step-wise regression.

RESULTS:

Of 7081 consecutive outpatients, 1218 (17.2%) were referred for post-polypectomy surveillance and 902 were included into the analysis. Surveillance colonoscopy was prescribed correctly in 330 subjects (36.6%) and earlier than recommended by guidelines in 490 (54.3%). Low-risk subjects had an anticipated surveillance colonoscopy more frequently than global cohort (67.4% vs. 54.3%, p<0.001). At multivariate analysis, determinants of correct surveillance timing were high-volume workload centres (OR 1.92; 1.41-2.63 95%CI), centres providing written recommendation on surveillance interval (OR 1.70; 1.18-2.58 95%CI) and surveillance examinations performed within the national screening programme (OR 2.62; 1.92-3.59 95%CI).

CONCLUSIONS:

In community practice, post-polipectomy surveillance colonoscopy is often performed earlier than recommended, especially in low-risk subjects. Interventions to improve adherence to guidelines and to reduce unnecessary examinations are needed.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01458093.

PMID:
22627070
DOI:
10.1016/j.dld.2012.04.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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