Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Dis Child. 2012 Jul;97(7):610-6. doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2011-301141. Epub 2012 May 23.

Delivery by caesarean section and risk of obesity in preschool age children: a prospective cohort study.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA. susanna.huh@childrens.harvard.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine whether delivery by caesarean section is a risk factor for childhood obesity.

DESIGN:

Prospective prebirth cohort study (Project Viva).

SETTING:

Eight outpatient multi-specialty practices based in the Boston, Massachusetts area.

PARTICIPANTS:

We recruited women during early pregnancy between 1999 and 2002, and followed their children after birth. We included 1255 children with body composition measured at 3 years of age.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

BMI score, obesity (BMI for age and sex ≥95th percentile), and sum of triceps plus subscapular skinfold thicknesses at 3 years of age.

RESULTS:

284 children (22.6%) were delivered by caesarean section. At age 3, 15.7% of children delivered by caesarean section were obese compared with 7.5% of children born vaginally. In multivariable logistic and linear regression models adjusting for maternal prepregnancy BMI, birth weight, and other covariates, birth by caesarean section was associated with a higher odds of obesity at age 3 (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.36 to 3.23), higher mean BMI z-score (0.20 units, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.33), and higher sum of triceps plus subscapular skinfold thicknesses (0.94 mm, 95% CI 0.36 to 1.51).

CONCLUSIONS:

Infants delivered by caesarean section may be at increased risk of childhood obesity. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings and to explore mechanisms underlying this association.

PMID:
22623615
PMCID:
PMC3784307
DOI:
10.1136/archdischild-2011-301141
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center