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Int J Colorectal Dis. 2012 Dec;27(12):1625-35. doi: 10.1007/s00384-012-1496-5. Epub 2012 May 25.

Does body mass index impact the number of LNs harvested and influence long-term survival rate in patients with stage III colon cancer?

Author information

1
Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 6 West Chia-Pu Road, Putz City, Chiayi, 61363, Taiwan, Republic of China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study is to evaluate whether different body mass index (BMI) values affect lymph node (LN) retrieval and whether such variations influence long-term survival in Asian patients.

METHOD:

From January 1995 to July 2003, 645 stage III colon cancer patients were enrolled in our study. Patients were stratified into four groups: Obese (BMI ≧ 27 kg/m(2)), overweight (24 ≤ BMI < 27 kg/m(2)), normal (18.5 ≤ BMI < 24 kg/m(2)), and underweight (BMI < 18.5 kg/m(2)).

RESULTS:

Mean BMI in the cohort was 23.3 kg/m(2). Mean number of LNs harvested was 23.1, 19.5, 19.8 and 28.1 in the normal, overweight, obese and underweight groups, respectively. There was a significant difference in the mean number of LNs harvested when comparing the overweight and underweight groups to the normal group (p = 0.013 and p = 0.04, respectively). Females were overrepresented in the underweight group (p = 0.011), and patients who had proximal colon cancers were more frequently underweight (p = 0.018). The mean number of LNs harvested varied by cases of right hemicolectomy (p = 0.009) and proximal cancer location (p = 0.009) for different BMI groups. Multivariate analysis showed that underweight, proximal colon cancer, well- or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma and stage IIIC cancer were significant variables for adequate LN recovery. BMI was not significantly associated with relapse-free survival (p = 0.523) or overall survival (p = 0.127).

CONCLUSION:

BMI is associated with LN harvest but is not an independent variable in stage III colon cancer survival.

PMID:
22622602
DOI:
10.1007/s00384-012-1496-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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