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Endocr Res. 2012;37(3):145-53. doi: 10.3109/07435800.2012.654556. Epub 2012 May 23.

Evaluation of the future atherosclerotic heart disease with oxidative stress and carotid artery intima media thickness in gestational diabetes mellitus.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey. drmvural@yahoo.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

In this study our aim was to evaluate paraoxonase (PON1) activity and free sulfhydryl groups (-SH) as antioxidative parameters and lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) as oxidative parameter in the serum of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and determine their relation with the degree of subclinical atherosclerosis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Serum samples from 39 pregnant women complicated with GDM and 40 healthy pregnant women were collected for the analysis of oxidative markers. Common carotid artery intima media thickness (CIMT) was measured for both groups to assess future atherosclerotic heart disease risk. PON1 activity and -SH were measured spectrophotometrically. LOOH levels were measured by ferrous oxidation with a xylenol orange assay.

RESULTS:

CIMT and LOOH levels were significantly higher (p = 0.01, p < 0.001, respectively) in GDM group compared to controls, whereas PON1 and -SH levels were significantly lower (p < 0.001 for both). CIMT values were significantly correlated with body mass index (BMI), 50 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) (p = 0.003, p = 0.02, and p = 0.03, respectively). However, there was no correlation between CIMT and oxidative markers.

CONCLUSIONS:

Increased levels of LOOH and decreased levels of PON1 and -SH showed disturbance of antioxidative mechanisms in GDM. These changes were associated with increased BMI and MABP which may be relevant to GDM pathophysiology. Furthermore, increased CIMT values in GDM compared to healthy controls designate increased risk of future atherosclerotic heart disease.

PMID:
22621394
DOI:
10.3109/07435800.2012.654556
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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