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Amyloid. 2012 Jun;19 Suppl 1:28-9. doi: 10.3109/13506129.2012.673514.

Focus on autonomic dysfunction in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP).

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1
Department of Diagnostic Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan. konen@fc.kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

Abstract

It is well known that autonomic dysfunction in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) is the most serious problem, because it restricts the daily life of these patients. The detail mechanisms of the onset are not well understood in FAP and domino liver transplantation-induced amyloid neuropathy. As autonomic disturbances play an important role in the symptomatology of FAP, further studies of autonomic dysfunction in these patients may lead the pathogenesis of FAP. Autonomic dysfunction is often observed before sensory and motor nerve dysfunction in FAP. This can be attributed to the morphological characteristics of the nerves. Unmyelinated, small myelinated, and large myelinated fibers tend to become impaired in that order. Although the reasons of susceptibility to amyloid infiltration and injury are not known, studies of autopsied FAP patients have revealed heavy infiltration of amyloid in autonomic ganglions. Moreover, spinal ganglion and posterior loot of the spine had severe amyloid deposits than did the anterior root of the spine or the motor nerves. It is well known that autonomic dysfunction is the most serious problem, because it restricts the daily life of FAP patients. However, we have four major questions about autonomic dysfunction in clinical. In this manuscript, we discuss about the answers of these questions.

PMID:
22620964
DOI:
10.3109/13506129.2012.673514
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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