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J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:907832. doi: 10.1155/2012/907832. Epub 2012 Apr 24.

Reshuffling and relocating: the gendered and income-related differential effects of restricting smoking locations.

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1
British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health, E311-4500 Oak Street (Box 48), Vancouver, BC, Canada V6H 3N1. nhemsing@cw.bc.ca

Abstract

This study investigates secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure and management in the context of smoking location restrictions, for nonsmokers, former, and current smokers. A purposive sample of 47 low income and non-low-income men and women of varied smoking statuses was recruited to participate in a telephone interview or a focus group. Amidst general approval of increased restrictions there were gendered patterns of SHS exposure and management, and effects of SHS policies that reflect power, control, and social roles that need to be considered as policies are developed, implemented and monitored. The experience of smoking restrictions and the management of SHS is influenced by the social context (relationship with a partner, family member, or stranger), the space of exposure (public or private, worksite), the social location of individuals involved (gender, income), and differential tolerance to SHS. This confluence of factors creates differing unintended and unexpected consequences to the social and physical situations of male and female smokers, nonsmokers, and former smokers. These factors deserve further study, in the interests of informing the development of future interventions and policies restricting SHS.

PMID:
22619688
PMCID:
PMC3348646
DOI:
10.1155/2012/907832
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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