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Eur J Nutr. 2013 Mar;52(2):717-26. doi: 10.1007/s00394-012-0377-6. Epub 2012 May 22.

Protective effect of myo-inositol hexaphosphate (phytate) on bone mass loss in postmenopausal women.

Author information

1
Servicio de Prevención de Riesgos Laborales de GESMA (Gestión Sanitaria de Mallorca), Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The objective of this paper was to evaluate the relationship between urinary concentrations of InsP6, bone mass loss and risk fracture in postmenopausal women.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A total of 157 postmenopausal women were included in the study: 70 had low (≤0.76 μM), 42 intermediate (0.76-1.42 μM) and 45 high (≥1.42 μM) urinary phytate concentrations. Densitometry values for neck were measured at enrollment and after 12 months (lumbar spine and femoral neck), and 10-year risk fracture was calculated using the tool FRAX(®).

RESULTS:

Individuals with low InsP6 levels had significantly greater bone mass loss in the lumbar spine (3.08 ± 0.65 % vs. 0.43 ± 0.55 %) than did those with high phytate levels. Moreover, a significantly greater percentage of women with low than with high InsP6 levels showed more than 2 % of bone mass loss in the lumbar spine (55.6 vs. 20.7 %). The 10-year fracture probability was also significantly higher in the low-phytate group compared to the high-phytate group, both in hip (0.37 ± 0.06 % vs 0.18 ± 0.04 %) and major osteoporotic fracture (2.45 ± 0.24 % vs 1.83 ± 0.11 %).

DISCUSSION:

It can be concluded that high urinary phytate concentrations are correlated with reduced bone mass loss in lumbar spine over 12 months and with reduced 10-year probability of hip and major osteoporotic fracture, indicating that increased phytate consumption can prevent development of osteoporosis.

PMID:
22614760
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-012-0377-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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