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Nicotine Tob Res. 2012 Dec;14(12):1394-406. doi: 10.1093/ntr/nts118. Epub 2012 May 21.

A review of culturally targeted/tailored tobacco prevention and cessation interventions for minority adolescents.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06519, USA. grace.kong@yale.edu

Abstract

AIM:

Emerging racial/ethnic disparities in tobacco use behaviors and resulting long-term health outcomes highlight the importance of developing culturally tailored/targeted tobacco prevention and cessation interventions. This manuscript describes the efficacy and the components of prevention and cessation interventions developed for minority adolescents.

METHODS:

Thirteen studies focused on culturally tailoring and targeting tobacco prevention/cessation interventions were selected and information on intervention design (type, number of sessions), setting (school or community), theoretical constructs, culture-specific components (surface/deep structures), and treatment outcomes were extracted.

RESULTS:

Of the 13 studies, 5 focused on prevention, 4 on cessation, and 4 combined prevention and cessation, and most of the studies were primarily school-based, while a few used community locations. Although diverse minority groups were targeted, a majority of the studies (n = 6) worked with Hispanic adolescents. The most common theoretical construct examined was the Social Influence Model (n = 5). The overall findings indicated that culturally tailoring cessation interventions did not appear to improve tobacco quit rates among minority adolescents, but culturally tailored prevention interventions appeared to produce lower tobacco initiation rates among minority adolescents than control conditions.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of review suggest that there is a critical need to develop better interventions to reduce tobacco use among minority adolescents and that developing a better understanding of cultural issues related to both cessation and initiation of tobacco use among minority populations is a key component of this endeavor.

PMID:
22614548
PMCID:
PMC3509015
DOI:
10.1093/ntr/nts118
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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