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Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 May-Jul;71(3-4):424-31. doi: 10.3109/00016357.2012.690531. Epub 2012 May 21.

The antimicrobial effect of new and conventional endodontic irrigants on intra-orally infected dentin.

Author information

1
Department of Endodontics, Bauru Dental School of Bauru, University of São Paulo, Brazil. ronaldordinola@usp.br

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate if the incorporation of antimicrobial compounds to chelating agents or the use of chelating agents with antimicrobial activity as 7% maleic acid and peracetic acid show similar disinfection ability in comparison to conventional irrigants as sodium hypochlorite or iodine potassium iodide against biofilms developed on dentin.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The total bio-volume of live cells, the ratio of live cells and the substratum coverage of dentin infected intra-orally and treated with the irrigant solutions: MTAD, Qmix, Smear Clear, 7% maleic acid, 2% iodine potassium iodide, 4% peracetic acid, 2.5% and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite was measured by using confocal microscopy and the live/dead technique. Five samples were used for each irrigant solution.

RESULTS:

Several endodontic irrigants containing antimicrobials as clorhexidine (Qmix), cetrimide (Smear Clear), maleic acid, iodine compounds or antibiotics (MTAD) lacked an effective antibiofilm activity when the dentin was infected intra-orally. The irrigant solutions 4% peracetic acid and 2.5-5.25% sodium hypochlorite decrease significantly the number of live bacteria in biofilms, providing also cleaner dentin surfaces (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Several chelating agents containing antimicrobials could not remove nor kill significantly biofilms developed on intra-orally infected dentin, with the exception of sodium hypochlorite and 4% peracetic acid. Dissolution ability is mandatory for an appropriate eradication of biofilms attached to dentin.

PMID:
22607322
DOI:
10.3109/00016357.2012.690531
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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