Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Epidemiol Infect. 2013 Mar;141(3):563-72. doi: 10.1017/S0950268812000921. Epub 2012 May 17.

Hepatitis C prevalence in injecting drug users in Europe, 1990-2007: impact of study recruitment setting.

Author information

1
Centre for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, The Netherlands.
2
European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA), Portugal.
3
Health Protection Scotland, Glasgow, UK.
4
Academic Centre of General Practice, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.
5
ASL TO3 - Piedmont Centre for Drug Addiction Epidemiology (OED), Italy.
6
National Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, Czech Republic.
7
Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
8
National Institute of Public Health - National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland.
9
National Centre of Health Management, Republic of Moldova.
10
Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Italy.
11
Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain.

Abstract

Monitoring injecting drug users' (IDUs) health is challenging because IDUs form a difficult to reach population. We examined the impact of recruitment setting on hepatitis C prevalence. Individual datasets from 12 studies were merged. Predictors of HCV positivity were sought through a multilevel analysis using a mixed-effects logistic model, with study identifier as random intercept. HCV prevalence ranged from 21% to 86% across the studies. Overall, HCV prevalence was higher in IDUs recruited in drug treatment centres compared to those recruited in low-threshold settings (74% and 42%, respectively, P < 0·001). Recruitment setting remained significantly associated with HCV prevalence after adjustment for duration of injecting and recent injection (adjusted odds ratio 0·7, 95% confidence interval 0·6-0·8, P = 0·05). Recruitment setting may have an impact on HCV prevalence estimates of IDUs in Europe. Assessing the impact of mixed recruitment strategies, including respondent-driven sampling, on HCV prevalence estimates, would be valuable.

PMID:
22595549
DOI:
10.1017/S0950268812000921
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Cambridge University Press
    Loading ...
    Support Center