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Front Genet. 2012 May 14;3:75. doi: 10.3389/fgene.2012.00075. eCollection 2012.

The use of next-generation sequencing in movement disorders.

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1
Department of Neurology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

New advances in genomic technology are being introduced at a greater speed and are revolutionizing the field of genetics for both complex and Mendelian diseases. For instance, during the past few years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a large number of significant associations between genomic loci and movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy. GWAS are carried out through the use of high-throughput SNP genotyping arrays, which are also used to perform linkage analyses in families previously considered statistically underpowered for genetic analyses. In inherited movement disorders, using this latter technology, it has repeatedly been shown that mutations in a single gene can lead to different phenotypes, while the same clinical entity can be caused by mutations in different genes. This is being highlighted with the use of next-generation sequencing technologies and leads to the search for genes or genetic modifiers that contribute to the phenotypic expression of movement disorders. Establishing an accurate genome-epigenome-phenotype relationship is becoming a major challenge in the post-genomic research that should be facilitated through the implementation of both functional and cellular analyses.

KEYWORDS:

gene discovery; movement disorders; next-generation sequencing; novel neurological phenotypes

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