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Prev Med. 2012 Jul;55(1):46-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.05.003. Epub 2012 May 14.

Associations of physical activity and screen-time on health related quality of life in adults.

Author information

1
Centre for Physical Activity Studies, Institute for Health and Social Science Research, CQUniversity Australia, Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia. cally1@ualberta.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Associations between the combined effect of physical activity and screen based activities on health related quality of life remain largely undetermined.

METHODS:

During 2008-2010, cross-sectional data for self-reported health related quality of life, physical activity, and screen-time were collected for 3796 Australian adults. Logistic regression was conducted to examine associations for six combinations of physical activity (none, insufficient, and sufficient), and screen-time (low and high) on health related quality of life.

RESULTS:

In comparison to the reference category (sufficient physical activity and low screen-time) men and women who reported no physical activity and either high (OR=4.52, 95% CI 2.82-7.25) or low (OR=2.29, 95% CI 1.37-3.80) screen-time, were significantly more likely to report over 14 unhealthy days. Men reporting either; no physical activity and high (OR=3.15, 95% CI 1.92-5.15), or low (OR=2.17, 95% CI 1.30-3.63) screen-time; insufficient physical activity and high (OR=1.68, 95% CI 1.08-2.60), or low (OR=1.79, 95% CI 1.14-2.82) screen-time were more likely to rate their health as poor or fair. In women this was significant for those who reported no physical activity and high screen-time (OR=1.98, 95% CI, 1.19-3.31).

CONCLUSIONS:

Results suggest that the combination of no physical activity and high screen-time demonstrated the greatest negative impact on health related quality of life.

PMID:
22588226
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.05.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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