Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Res Cardiol. 2012 Oct;101(10):805-13. Epub 2012 May 15.

Green tea halts progression of cardiac transthyretin amyloidosis: an observational report.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, Angiology, and Respiratory Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. Arnt_Kristen@med.uni-heidelberg.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Treatment options in patients with amyloidotic transthyretin (ATTR) cardiomyopathy are limited. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant catechin in green tea (GT), inhibits fibril formation from several amyloidogenic proteins in vitro. Thus, it might also halt progression of TTR amyloidosis. This is a single-center observational report on the effects of GT consumption in patients with ATTR cardiomopathy.

METHODS:

19 patients with ATTR cardiomyopathy were evaluated by standard blood tests, echocardiography, and cardiac MRI (n = 9) before and after consumption of GT and/or green tea extracts (GTE) for 12 months.

RESULTS:

Five patients were not followed up for reasons of death (n = 2), discontinuation of GT/GTE consumption (n = 2), and heart transplantation (n = 1). After 12 months no increase of left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and LV myocardial mass was observed by echocardiography. In the subgroup of patients evaluated by cardiac MRI a mean decrease of LV myocardial mass (-12.5 %) was detected in all patients. This was accompanied by an increase of mean mitral annular systolic velocity of 9 % in all 14 patients. Total cholesterol (191.9 ± 8.9 vs. 172.7 ± 9.4 mg/dL; p < 0.01) and LDL cholesterol (105.8 ± 7.6 vs. 89.5 ± 8.0 mg/dL; p < 0.01) decreased significantly during the observational period. No serious adverse effects were reported by any of the participants.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our observation suggests an inhibitory effect of GT and/or GTE on the progression of cardiac amyloidosis. We propose a randomized placebo-controlled investigation to confirm our observation.

PMID:
22584381
PMCID:
PMC3445797
DOI:
10.1007/s00392-012-0463-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center