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J Neurooncol. 2012 Sep;109(2):273-83. doi: 10.1007/s11060-012-0889-1. Epub 2012 May 12.

Stereotactic iodine-125 brachytherapy for treatment of inoperable focal brainstem gliomas of WHO grades I and II: feasibility and long-term outcome.

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1
Department of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Cologne, Kerpener Straße 62 Main Clinic Building 11th Floor, 50937, Cologne, Germany. maximilian.ruge@uk-koeln.de

Abstract

Microsurgical resection is the most frequently suggested treatment option for accessible focal brainstem gliomas (F-BSG) of World Health Organization (WHO) grades I and II. Because of their location in the highly eloquent brain, however, resection is associated with permanent postoperative morbidity, ranging from 12 to 33 %. Only a few reports have suggested stereotactic brachytherapy (SBT) with implantation of iodine-125 seeds as a local treatment alternative. Between 1993 and 2010, 47 patients were treated with SBT (iodine-125 seeds; cumulative surface dose 50-65 Gy) for inoperable F-BSG, WHO grades I and II, in one of the largest reported patient series. We evaluated procedure-related complications, clinical outcome, and progression-free and overall survival (PFS, OS). Median follow-up was 81.6 months. Procedure-related mortality was zero. Within 30 days of seed implantation six patients (12.8 %) had transient neurological deficits. Two patients (4.3 %) deteriorated permanently. Space-occupying cysts occurred in six patients (12.8 %) after a median of 28.5 months, and required surgical intervention. Nine patients (19.1 %) presented with tumor relapse after a median of 56.6 months (range 7.9-118.0 months). For the remaining 38 patients complete response was observed for 23.4 %, partial response for 29.8 %, and stable disease for 27.7 %. Actuarial PFS was 97.7 ± 2.2, 92.8 ± 4.0, 81.2 ± 6.5, and 62.0 ± 10.4 % after 1, 2, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Corresponding OS was 100 ± 0.0 % (1 and 2 years), 97.4 ± 2.6 % (5 years), and 87.6 ± 7.0 % (10 years). SBT is a comparatively safe, minimally invasive, and highly effective local treatment option for patients with inoperable F-BSG WHO grades I and II; it merits further evaluation in prospective randomized trials.

PMID:
22580799
DOI:
10.1007/s11060-012-0889-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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