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J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2012 Jun;25(3):195-200. doi: 10.1016/j.jpag.2012.01.005.

Retrospective review of intrauterine device in adolescent and young women.

Author information

1
University of Louisville, School of Medicine Department of Pediatrics, Louisville, KY, USA.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

To examine our experience with intrauterine device (IUD) use in adolescents and young women.

DESIGN:

Retrospective descriptive study evaluating outcomes after IUD insertion for patients 21 years or less over an 8-year period.

SETTING:

Three sites including a Pediatric and Adolescent gynecology private practice, a Title X clinic, and community based, grant funded clinic serving a high risk teen population.

PARTICIPANTS:

Females from menarche to age 21.

MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURED:

The probability of IUD retention, differences in IUD retention probabilities between two age groups, and risk factors for IUD removal, expulsion, and infection were evaluated.

RESULTS:

233 records showed 50% of the <18-year-old age group and 71.5% of the 18-21-year-old group had their IUD in place at 5 years. Age was found to be a significant factor for removal (P < 0.001), with under 18-year-olds at greater risk of removal/expulsion (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.85). Parity (RR = 5.6 for nulliparous vs multiparous patients, P < 0.001) and prior STI (RR = 5.5, P < 0.001) were significant risk factors for infection. Nulliparous patients were at higher risk of expulsion (P = 0.045), though age was not a statistically significant risk factor.

CONCLUSIONS:

The rate of continuation was lower in adolescents under 18 compared to 18-21-year-olds, but was still higher than for other hormonal contraceptives. Despite this groups' high risk for STI the IUD did not increase the risk of infection and may offer some degree of protection. IUDs appear to be a safe option in young adolescents (<18 years old) and nulliparous women.

PMID:
22578480
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpag.2012.01.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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