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J Voice. 2012 Nov;26(6):785-91. doi: 10.1016/j.jvoice.2011.11.007. Epub 2012 May 11.

Laryngoplasty with hyaluronic acid in patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Section of Phoniatrics and Pedaudiology, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany. rudolf.reiter@uniklinik-ulm.de

Erratum in

  • J Voice. 2013 Mar;27(2):131. Rudolf, Reiter [corrected to Reiter, Rudolf]; Sibylle, Brosch [corrected to Brosch, Sibylle].

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Augmentation of vocal fold with hyaluronic acid (Restylane; Q-Med AB, Uppsala, Sweden) is used as a therapeutic option for insufficient glottic closure in unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVP). Analysis of the optimal glottic width, effectiveness (long-term voice improvement as a consequence of longevity of Restylane), and safety of this new method was made.

STUDY DESIGN/METHODS:

In a prospective clinical cohort study, 19 consecutive patients with UVP who received vocal fold augmentation with hyaluronic acid (Restylane) were examined preoperatively; 6 weeks, 6, and 12 months postoperatively by laryngostroboscopy; and their voice was evaluated by subjective, objective, and self-assessment (Voice Handicap Index).

RESULTS:

In 11 of 19 (58%) patients, a subjectively and objectively acceptable voice quality was observed in a follow-up of 12 months. Eight of 19 (42%) patients had a considerable impairment of the voice after 6 weeks (range: 1-24 weeks). Therefore, another intervention (eg, injection laryngoplasty or thyroplasty) was recommended. An impairment of voice was mainly observed if the preoperative glottal gap during phonation was more than 1 mm.

CONCLUSION:

A long duration (up to 12 months) of acceptable quality of voice was achieved by augmentation with Restylane, if the glottal gap was 1 mm or less videolaryngostroboscopically during phonation. The authors recommend this therapy for temporary voice improvement and to augment vocal therapy, if spontaneous recovery of voice is likely. Long-term results remain to be seen.

PMID:
22578435
DOI:
10.1016/j.jvoice.2011.11.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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