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Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2012 Mar;14(1):49-54.

Creativity in art and science: are there two cultures?

Author information

1
Psychiatric Iowa Neuroimaging Consortium; University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine; Iowa City, Iowa, USA.

Abstract

The study of creativity is characterized by a variety of key questions, such as the nature of the creative process, whether there are multiple types of creativity, the relationship between high levels of creativity ("Big C") and everyday creativity ("little c"), and the neural basis of creativity. Herein we examine the question of the relationship between creativity in the arts and the sciences, and use functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore the neural basis of creativity in a group of "Big C" individuals from both domains using a word association protocol. The findings give no support for the notion that the artists and scientists represent "two cultures. " Rather, they suggest that very gifted artists and scientists have association cortices that respond in similar ways. Both groups display a preponderance of activation in brain circuits involved in higher-order socioaffective processing and Random Episodic Silent Thought /the default mode.

KEYWORDS:

REST; association cortex; creativity; default network; fMR; neuroimaging

PMID:
22577304
PMCID:
PMC3341649
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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