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J Orthop Traumatol. 2012 Sep;13(3):137-43. doi: 10.1007/s10195-012-0187-x. Epub 2012 May 11.

The migration pattern of the Charnley femoral stem: a five-year follow-up RSA study in a well-functioning patient group.

Author information

1
Orthopaedic Research Centre, Trondheim University Hospital, 7006, Trondheim, Norway. kristin.haugan@ntnu.no

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Implant stability is considered vital to long-time implant survival in total hip arthroplasty (THA), since loose implants are reported to be a major cause of hip revision. There is an association between early implant micromotion and increased risk of revision. More implant-specific data are needed to establish acceptable levels of early implant movement.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Thirty-five patients (36 hips) undergoing Charnley THA were followed with repeated clinical, radiographic, and radiostereometric analysis (RSA) over 5 years. Twenty-three patients attended 5 years postoperatively.

RESULTS:

The patient group was well functioning based on the radiological and clinical evaluations. The stems constantly moved up to 5 years postoperatively, with subsidence, retroversion, and varus tilt, based on the RSA.

CONCLUSION:

Continuous movement of the Charnley stem was observed up to 5 years postoperatively in a well-functioning patient group. The migration data presented herein could be useful when defining acceptable migration limits for certain types of cemented femoral stems.

PMID:
22576838
PMCID:
PMC3427697
DOI:
10.1007/s10195-012-0187-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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