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Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Jul;23(7):1065-74. doi: 10.1007/s10552-012-9975-0. Epub 2012 May 11.

Plasma micronutrients, trace elements, and breast cancer in BRCA1 mutation carriers: an exploratory study.

Author information

1
Women's College Research Institute, Toronto, ON, Canada. joanne.kotsopoulos@wchospital.ca

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Few studies have evaluated the role of micronutrients or trace elements in breast cancer development among BRCA1 mutation carriers. To investigate a possible role of dietary and environmental exposures on cancer risk, we undertook an exploratory study, using a matched case-control design (n = 48 cases and 96 controls), to evaluate the relationships between plasma levels of 14 micronutrients and breast cancer risk among BRCA1 mutation carriers in Poland.

METHODS:

We estimated the univariate odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for breast cancer associated with plasma levels for each of 14 micronutrients.

RESULTS:

Of the 14 analytes quantified, significant differences between cases and controls were seen for two (iron and retinol; p = 0.009 and p = 0.03, respectively). Women in the highest tertile of plasma iron had a 57 % lower risk, compared with those in the lowest quartile (OR = 0.43; 95 % CI 0.18-1.04; p for trend = 0.06). Increasing antimony levels were associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (p for trend = 0.05). Women in the highest tertile had a 2.43-fold increase in breast cancer risk compared with women in the lowest tertile (OR = 2.43; 95 % CI 1.00-5.91).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides some preliminary evidence regarding a role of diet, specifically iron and antimony, in the etiology of BRCA1-associated breast cancer. Prospective studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

PMID:
22576580
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-012-9975-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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