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Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2012 Sep;77(3):343-50. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2265.2012.04434.x.

Vitamin D in the aetiology and management of polycystic ovary syndrome.

Author information

1
Nutritional Physiology Research Centre, Sansom Institute for Health Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia. rebecca.thomson@unisa.edu.au

Abstract

Vitamin D deficiency is common in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), with the 67-85% of women with PCOS having serum concentrations of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD) <20 ng/ml. Vitamin D deficiency may exacerbate symptoms of PCOS, with observational studies showing lower 25OHD levels were associated with insulin resistance, ovulatory and menstrual irregularities, lower pregnancy success, hirsutism, hyperandrogenism, obesity and elevated cardiovascular disease risk factors. There is some, but limited, evidence for beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation on menstrual dysfunction and insulin resistance in women with PCOS. Vitamin D deficiency may play a role in exacerbating PCOS, and there may be a place for vitamin D supplementation in the management of this syndrome, but current evidence is limited and additional randomized controlled trials are required to confirm the potential benefits of vitamin D supplementation in this population.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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