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Clin Infect Dis. 2012 Jun;54 Suppl 5:S391-5. doi: 10.1093/cid/cis243.

Increasing rates of vibriosis in the United States, 1996-2010: review of surveillance data from 2 systems.

Author information

1
Enteric Diseases Epidemiology Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30033, USA. aenewton@cdc.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention monitors vibriosis through 2 surveillance systems: the nationwide Cholera and Other Vibrio Illness Surveillance (COVIS) system and the 10-state Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet). COVIS conducts passive surveillance and FoodNet conducts active surveillance for laboratory-confirmed Vibrio infections.

METHODS:

We summarized Vibrio infections (excluding toxigenic V. cholerae O1 and O139) reported to COVIS and FoodNet from 1996 through 2010. For each system, we calculated incidence rates using US Census Bureau population estimates for the surveillance area.

RESULTS:

From 1996 to 2010, 7700 cases of vibriosis were reported to COVIS and 1519 to FoodNet. Annual incidence of reported vibriosis per 100,000 population increased from 1996 to 2010 in both systems, from 0.09 to 0.28 in COVIS and from 0.15 to 0.42 in FoodNet. The 3 commonly reported Vibrio species were V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and V. alginolyticus; both surveillance systems showed that the incidence of each increased. In both systems, most hospitalizations and deaths were caused by V. vulnificus infection, and most patients were white men. The number of cases peaked in the summer months.

CONCLUSIONS:

Surveillance data from both COVIS and FoodNet indicate that the incidence of vibriosis increased from 1996 to 2010 overall and for each of the 3 most commonly reported species. Epidemiologic patterns were similar in both systems. Current prevention efforts have failed to prevent increasing rates of vibriosis; more effective efforts will be needed to decrease rates.

PMID:
22572659
PMCID:
PMC4604744
DOI:
10.1093/cid/cis243
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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