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J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2012 Dec;21(12):1721-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jse.2012.01.023. Epub 2012 May 5.

Surgical treatment of anterior instability in rugby union players: clinical and radiographic results of the Latarjet-Patte procedure with minimum 5-year follow-up.

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1
Centre Orthopédique Santy, Lyon, France. neyton.lionel@orange.fr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Anterior instability in rugby players is characterized by the common finding of a bony lesion, which has been identified as a potential cause of recurrence after soft-tissue reconstruction. The Latarjet-Patte procedure is effective in the treatment of recurrent anterior instability in collision sports such as rugby union.

METHODS:

We retrospectively assessed 34 rugby players (37 shoulders) stabilized with the Latarjet-Patte procedure. The mean follow-up was 12 years. All patients underwent clinical and radiographic assessment preoperatively and at final follow-up. Functional evaluation was performed with the Walch-Duplay and Rowe scores. A visual analog scale score for the evaluation of pain and the subjective shoulder value were recorded. In addition, all patients completed a questionnaire regarding the return to playing rugby.

RESULTS:

No recurrence of either dislocation or subluxation occurred. Persistent apprehension on clinical examination was present in 5 patients (14%). A bony lesion of the glenoid was present in 73% and a Hill-Sachs lesion in 68%. Sixty-five percent of the patients returned to playing rugby; only 1 patient did not return to playing rugby because of his shoulder. The mean Walch-Duplay and Rowe scores were 86 and 93 points, respectively. The mean subjective shoulder value was 90%. Radiographic healing of the bone block was observed in 89% of cases. At final follow-up, 11 patients (30%) had minor arthritic changes, with no cases of moderate or severe arthritis.

CONCLUSION:

The Latarjet-Patte procedure provides a reliable method for stabilizing the shoulder, resulting in a return to playing rugby in a high number of cases without increasing the risk of long-term arthritic degradation.

PMID:
22565042
DOI:
10.1016/j.jse.2012.01.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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