Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Patient Prefer Adherence. 2012;6:337-48. doi: 10.2147/PPA.S29606. Epub 2012 Apr 18.

Patient satisfaction with pharmaceutical care delivery in community pharmacies.

Author information

1
School of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purpose of this study was to validate previously published satisfaction scales in larger and more diversified patient populations; to expand the number of community pharmacies represented; to test the robustness of satisfaction measures across a broader demographic spectrum and a variety of health conditions; to confirm the three-factor scale structure; to test the relationships between satisfaction and consultation practices involving pharmacists and pharmacy students; and to examine service gaps and establish plausible norms.

METHODS:

Patients completed a 15-question survey about their expectations regarding pharmaceutical care-related activities while shopping in any pharmacy and a parallel 15 questions about their experiences while shopping in this particular pharmacy. The survey also collected information regarding pharmaceutical care consultation received by the patients and brief demographic data.

RESULTS:

A total of 628 patients from 55 pharmacies completed the survey. The pilot study's three-factor satisfaction structure was confirmed. Overall, satisfaction measures did not differ by demographics or medical condition, but there were strong and significant store-to-store differences and consultation practice advantages when pharmacists or pharmacists-plus-students participated, but not for consultations with students alone.

CONCLUSION:

Patient satisfaction can be reliably measured by surveys structured around pharmaceutical care activities. The introduction of pharmaceutical care in pharmacies improves patient satisfaction. Service gap details indicated that pharmacy managers need to pay closer attention to various consultative activities involving patients and doctors.

KEYWORDS:

advanced pharmacy practice experience; medication management; patient expectations; patient experiences

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Dove Medical Press Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center