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World J Gastroenterol. 2012 May 7;18(17):2076-83. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v18.i17.2076.

Age, smoking and overweight contribute to the development of intestinal metaplasia of the cardia.

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1
Service of Gastroenterology, University Hospital, 1000 Lausanne, Switzerland.

Abstract

AIM:

To assess the role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), age, smoking and body weight on the development of intestinal metaplasia of the gastric cardia (IMC).

METHODS:

Two hundred and seventeen patients scheduled for esophagogastroduodenoscopy were enrolled in this study. Endoscopic biopsies from the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction and stomach were evaluated for inflammation, the presence of H. pylori and intestinal metaplasia. The correlation of these factors with the presence of IMC was assessed using logistic regression.

RESULTS:

IMC was observed in 42% of the patients. Patient age, smoking habit and body mass index (BMI) were found as potential contributors to IMC. The risk of developing IMC can be predicted in theory by combining these factors according to the following formula: Risk of IMC = a + s - 2B where a = 2,…6 decade of age, s = 0 for non-smokers or ex-smokers, 1 for < 10 cigarettes/d, 2 for > 10 cigarettes/d and B = 0 for BMI < 25 kg/m² (BMI < 27 kg/m² in females), 1 for BMI > 25 kg/m² (BMI > 27 kg/m² in females). Among potential factors associated with IMC, H. pylori had borderline significance (P = 0.07), while GERD showed no significance.

CONCLUSION:

Age, smoking and BMI are potential factors associated with IMC, while H. pylori and GERD show no significant association. IMC can be predicted in theory by logistic regression analysis.

KEYWORDS:

Endoscopy; Gastroesophageal reflux disease; Helicobacter pylori; Metaplasia; Obesity; Smoking

PMID:
22563195
PMCID:
PMC3342606
DOI:
10.3748/wjg.v18.i17.2076
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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