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J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Jun 26;142(1):221-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2012.04.048. Epub 2012 May 3.

Salacia oblonga ameliorates hypertriglyceridemia and excessive ectopic fat accumulation in laying hens.

Author information

1
Division of Metabolism, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, 1 Yixueyuan Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400016, China.

Abstract

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE:

Salacia oblonga root (SOR) is an Ayurvedic medicine for obesity and diabetes, those are associated with glucose and lipid metabolism.

AIM OF THE STUDY:

SOR has been demonstrated previously to improve glucose and lipid metabolism in animal models of obesity and diabetes and to be a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha activator. However, the anti-obesogenic and anti-diabetic mechanisms of SOR are still not largely understood. Here, we investigated the effects of SOR on lipid metabolism using laying hen, a unique animal model with a very high rate of triglyceride synthesis in the liver.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Laying hens and preadolescent pullets were treated with the layer ration containing 0%, 0.5%, or 1% SOR water extract for 4 weeks. Biochemical variables were determined enzymatically.

RESULTS:

Laying hens showed much higher fasted triglyceride concentrations (increased by 5-13 folds) in plasma, liver, skeletal muscle and heart than pullets. 1% SOR extract treatment inhibited body weight increase without affecting food intake. Importantly, this treatment substantially attenuated hypertriglyceridemia and inhibited increases in triglyceride contents in the non-adipose tissues. However, SOR extract did not induce change in plasma glucose concentration. Moreover, SOR extract did not alter all variables in pullets.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results demonstrate that SOR ameliorates hypertriglyceridemia and excessive ectopic fat accumulation in laying hens. These findings suggest that the triglyceride-lowering property is one of the primary effects of SOR, possibly via hepatic mechanisms.

PMID:
22561158
DOI:
10.1016/j.jep.2012.04.048
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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