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Int J Cardiol. 2013 Aug 20;167(4):1430-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2012.04.061. Epub 2012 May 4.

Missing, unreplaced teeth and risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality.

Author information

1
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Gerodontology and Biomaterials, Centre of Oral Health, University of Greifswald, 17487 Greifswald, Rotgerberstraße 8, Germany. schwahn@uni-greifswald.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A dentition of at least 20 teeth is associated with sufficient masticatory efficiency and is a stated health goal of the World Health Organisation. We examined whether subjects with missing, unreplaced teeth had an increased mortality risk.

METHODS:

We used data prospectively collected from those participants in the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania who had fewer than 20 remaining teeth, resulting in a sample of 1803 participants with a median age of 64 years. Of those, 188 subjects had 9 or more unreplaced teeth. During a median follow-up period of 9.9 years, 362 subjects died, 128 of whom of cardiovascular causes.

RESULTS:

We found that having 9 or more unreplaced teeth was related to all-cause mortality (rate ratio 1.53, 95% CI: 1.11-2.10; adjusted for variables according to causal diagrams: remaining teeth, age, sex, education, income, marital status, partnership, and oral health behaviour) and cardiovascular mortality (rate ratio 1.94, 95% CI: 1.15-3.25). When adjusting not only for the variables according to causal diagrams but also for smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, the rate ratio was 1.43 (95% CI: 1.05-1.96) for all-cause mortality and 1.88 (95% CI: 1.10-3.21) for cardiovascular mortality.

CONCLUSIONS:

A reduced, unrestored dentition is associated with increased mortality risk. Thus, clinicians and dietitians have a responsibility to consider individual chewing ability in nutritional recommendations.

KEYWORDS:

Cause of death; Dental prosthesis; Fatal outcome; Prospective studies; Tooth loss

PMID:
22560949
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijcard.2012.04.061
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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