Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Apr;17(3):520-9. doi: 10.1007/s10995-012-1026-7.

Prevalence and correlates of drinking in early pregnancy among women who stopped drinking on pregnancy recognition.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, School of Population Health, The University of Auckland, Building 730, 261 Morrin Road, Glenn Innes, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand. s.parackal@auckland.ac.nz

Abstract

Women of child bearing age that regularly drink alcohol are at risk for drinking in early pregnancy. Evidence indicates a majority of women stop alcohol consumption on pregnancy recognition. However, there is a dearth of studies reporting on patterns and correlates of drinking in early pregnancy prior to stopping on pregnancy recognition, which the current study aims to address. In 2005, a New Zealand nationwide cross-sectional survey was conducted on a random sample of 1,256 women aged 16-40 years. Data were collected via an interviewer-administered questionnaire using a web-assisted telephone interviewing system. Of the 1,256 women who participated, 127 (10 %) were currently pregnant and 425 women (34 %) were previously pregnant. Half of currently pregnant women and 37 % of previously pregnant women reported that they ceased drinking on recognising pregnancy. Women categorised as "risky drinkers" and those aged 16-24 years had higher odds to drink and binge drink in early pregnancy, compared with non-risky drinkers and women of other age categories respectively. A majority of women stop alcohol consumption on pregnancy recognition but prior to this, drink at levels posing a risk for the developing foetus. Women most at risk for drinking and binge drinking in early pregnancy were younger in age and exhibited risky drinking behaviour prior to pregnancy. A targeted intervention to reduce the risk for an alcohol exposed pregnancy is warranted for sexually active younger women in New Zealand and elsewhere.

PMID:
22555945
DOI:
10.1007/s10995-012-1026-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center