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Curr Opin Hematol. 2012 Jul;19(4):319-23. doi: 10.1097/MOH.0b013e32835423c3.

Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors reactivity and outcome of stem cell transplant.

Author information

1
Division of Hematology and Clinical Immunology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy. velardi@unipg.it

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

This review focuses on advances in the field of natural killer (NK) cell alloreactivity as a form of immunotherapy in the setting of allogeneic haematopoietic transplantation.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Recent research has focused on mechanisms underlying the acquisition of function by NK cells after haematopoietic transplantation, on the therapeutic impact of NK-cell alloreactivity in various forms of transplantation and in adoptive immunotherapy. Finally, studies have highlighted the role of NK-cell responses in viral infections after transplantation.

SUMMARY:

Donor-versus-recipient NK-cell alloreactivity is established as a key therapeutic element in human leukocyte antigen haplotype-mismatched haematopoietic transplants in adult acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). NK-cell allotherapy for leukaemia is deployed through stem cell transplantation (and ensuing NK-cell reconstitution) across killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor ligand mismatches. Donor-derived NK cells were also reported to respond to cytomegalovirus by acquiring features that are reminiscent of the specificity and memory of adaptive (T-cell) immune responses. As NK cells are the earliest immune cells to recover after transplant, this observation suggests they may contribute to controlling viral reactivation early after transplant.

PMID:
22555394
DOI:
10.1097/MOH.0b013e32835423c3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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