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Child Psychiatry Hum Dev. 2012 Dec;43(6):943-57. doi: 10.1007/s10578-012-0305-2.

Perceived child behavior problems, parenting stress, and maternal depressive symptoms among prenatal methamphetamine users.

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  • 1Department of Psychology, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK 74104-3189, USA. brandi-sebourn@utulsa.edu

Abstract

The present study was designed to examine parenting stress, maternal depressive symptoms, and perceived child behavior problems among mothers who used methamphetamine (MA) during pregnancy. Participants were a subsample (n = 212; 75 exposed, 137 comparison) of biological mothers who had continuous custody of their child from birth to 36 months. The subsample was drawn from a larger, ongoing longitudinal study on the effects of prenatal methamphetamine exposure (n = 412; 204 exposed, 208 comparison) (Arria et al in Matern Child Health J 10:293-302 2006). Mothers who used MA during pregnancy reported more parenting stress and more depressive symptoms than a matched comparison group. There were no differences between groups on perceived child behavior problems. In a hierarchical linear model, depressive symptoms, and perceived child behavior problems, but not MA exposure, were statistically significant predictors of parenting stress. Screening for potential parenting problems among mothers with a history of substance abuse is warranted. Parenting interventions targeting depressive symptoms, parenting stress, and child behavior problems are needed for this population.

PMID:
22552952
PMCID:
PMC3717339
DOI:
10.1007/s10578-012-0305-2
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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