Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces. 2012 May;4(5):2726-34. doi: 10.1021/am3003632. Epub 2012 May 3.

Rapid release of plasmid DNA from surfaces coated with polyelectrolyte multilayers promoted by the application of electrochemical potentials.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA.

Abstract

We report an approach to the rapid release of DNA based on the application of electrochemical potentials to surfaces coated with polyelectrolyte-based thin films. We fabricated multilayered polyelectrolyte films (or "polyelectrolyte multilayers", PEMs) using plasmid DNA and a model hydrolytically degradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (polymer 1) on stainless steel substrates using a layer-by-layer approach. The application of continuous reduction potentials in the range of -1.1 to -0.7 V (vs a Ag/AgCl electrode) to film-coated electrodes in PBS at 37 °C resulted in the complete release of DNA over a period of 1-2 min. Film-coated electrodes incubated under identical conditions in the absence of applied potentials required 1-2 days for complete release. Control over the magnitude of the applied potential provided control over the rate at which DNA was released. The results of these and additional physical characterization experiments are consistent with a mechanism of film disruption that is promoted by local increases in pH at the film/electrode interface (resulting from electrochemical reduction of water or dissolved oxygen) that disrupt ionic interactions in these materials. The results of cell-based experiments demonstrated that DNA was released in a form that remains intact and able to promote transgene expression in mammalian cells. Finally, we demonstrate that short-term (i.e., non-continuous) electrochemical treatments can also be used to promote faster film erosion (e.g., over 1-2 h) once the potential is removed. Past studies demonstrate that PEMs fabricated using polymer 1 can promote surface-mediated transfection of cells and tissues in vitro and in vivo. With further development, the electrochemical approaches reported here could thus provide new methods for the rapid, triggered, or spatially patterned transfer of DNA (or other agents) from surfaces of interest in a variety of fundamental and applied contexts.

PMID:
22551230
PMCID:
PMC3359390
DOI:
10.1021/am3003632
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for American Chemical Society Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center