Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2012 May 18;421(4):768-72. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2012.04.081. Epub 2012 Apr 21.

Autophagy in the intestinal epithelium is not involved in the pathogenesis of intestinal tumors.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1, Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017, Japan.

Abstract

Autophagy has been demonstrated to be associated with the pathogenesis of cancer, but no consensus has been reached about its precise role. Therefore, we investigated whether autophagy in the intestinal epithelium is involved in the pathogenesis of intestinal tumors. To evaluate the relationship between autophagy and intestinal tumors, GFP-LC3-APC(min/+) mice were generated by mating GFP-LC3 transgenic mice with APC(min/+) mice. Autophagy was weakly induced in the intestinal polyp regions of the mice in comparison to their non-polyp regions. Under starved conditions, autophagy was not induced in the polyp regions, whereas it was observed in the non-polyp regions. Then, to examine whether a lack of autophagy in the intestinal epithelium enhances the induction of intestinal tumor, Atg7flox/flox:vil-cre-APC(min/+) mice, in which Atg7 had been conditionally deleted in the intestinal epithelium, were generated by mating Atg7flox/flox:vil-cre mice with APC(min/+) mice. However, there was no significant difference in the number of intestinal polyps between the Atg7flox/flox:vil-cre-APC(min/+) and the corresponding control Atg7flox/flox-APC(min/+) mice. These results indicate that autophagy in the intestinal epithelium is not involved in the pathogenesis of intestinal tumors, and future research should focus on regulating autophagy as a form of cancer therapy.

PMID:
22546555
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbrc.2012.04.081
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center