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Plast Reconstr Surg. 2012 May;129(5):1113-9. doi: 10.1097/PRS.0b013e31824a2c31.

Outcome comparison of endoscopic and transpalpebral decompression for treatment of frontal migraine headaches.

Author information

1
Department of Plastic Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study was designed to compare the efficacy of the transpalpebral versus endoscopic approach to decompression of the supraorbital and supratrochlear nerves in patients with frontal migraine headaches.

METHODS:

The medical charts of 253 patients who underwent surgery for frontal migraine headaches were reviewed. These patients underwent either transpalpebral nerve decompression (n = 62) or endoscopic nerve decompression (n = 191). Preoperative and 12-month or greater postoperative migraine frequency, duration, and intensity were analyzed to determine the success of the surgeries.

RESULTS:

Forty-nine of 62 patients (79 percent) in the transpalpebral nerve decompression group and 170 of 191 patients (89 percent) who underwent endoscopic nerve decompression experienced a successful outcome (at least a 50 percent decrease in migraine frequency, duration, or intensity) after 1 year from surgery. Endoscopic nerve decompression had a significantly higher success rate than transpalpebral nerve decompression (p < 0.05). Thirty-two patients (52 percent) in the transpalpebral nerve decompression group and 128 patients (67 percent) who underwent endoscopic nerve decompression observed elimination of migraine headaches. The elimination rate was significantly higher in the endoscopic nerve decompression group than in the transpalpebral nerve decompression group (p < 0.03).

CONCLUSION:

Endoscopic nerve decompression was found to be more successful at reducing or eliminating frontal migraine headaches than transpalpebral nerve decompression and should be selected as the first choice whenever it is anatomically feasible.

CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Therapeutic, III.

PMID:
22544095
DOI:
10.1097/PRS.0b013e31824a2c31
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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