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Expert Opin Ther Targets. 2012 Jun;16(6):601-12. doi: 10.1517/14728222.2012.682573. Epub 2012 Apr 25.

The potential use of toxin antibodies as a strategy for controlling acute Staphylococcus aureus infections.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis, NIAID, NIH, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The pandemic human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, displays high levels of antibiotic resistance and is a major cause of hospital- and community-associated infections. S. aureus disease manifestation is to a great extent due to the production of a large arsenal of virulence factors, which include a series of secreted toxins. Antibodies to S. aureus toxins are found in people who are infected or asymptomatically colonized with S. aureus. Immunotherapies consisting of neutralizing anti-toxin antibodies could provide immediate aid to patients with impaired immune systems or in advanced stages of disease.

AREAS COVERED:

Important S. aureus toxins, their roles in pathogenesis, rationales for selecting S. aureus toxins for immunization efforts, and caveats associated with monoclonal antibody-based passive immunization are discussed. This review will focus on hyper-virulent community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus because of their recent surge and clinical importance.

EXPERT OPINION:

Antibodies against genome-encoded toxins may be more broadly applicable than those directed against toxins found only in a sub-population of S. aureus isolates. Furthermore, there is substantial functional redundancy among S. aureus toxins. Thus, an optimal anti-S. aureus formulation may consist of multiple antibodies directed against a series of key S. aureus genome-encoded toxins.

PMID:
22530584
PMCID:
PMC3354029
DOI:
10.1517/14728222.2012.682573
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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