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Prev Med. 2012 Jun;54(6):381-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.04.003. Epub 2012 Apr 12.

A comparison of prevalence estimates for selected health indicators and chronic diseases or conditions from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, the National Health Interview Survey, and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2008.

Author information

1
Division of Behavioral Surveillance, Public Health Surveillance & Informatics Program Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. cli@cdc.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the prevalence estimates of selected health indicators and chronic diseases or conditions among three national health surveys in the United States.

METHODS:

Data from adults aged 18 years or older who participated in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 2007 and 2008 (n=807,524), the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) in 2007 and 2008 (n=44,262), and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) during 2007 and 2008 (n=5871) were analyzed.

RESULTS:

The prevalence estimates of current smoking, obesity, hypertension, and no health insurance were similar across the three surveys, with absolute differences ranging from 0.7% to 3.9% (relative differences: 2.3% to 20.2%). The prevalence estimate of poor or fair health from BRFSS was similar to that from NHANES, but higher than that from NHIS. The prevalence estimates of diabetes, coronary heart disease, and stroke were similar across the three surveys, with absolute differences ranging from 0.0% to 0.8% (relative differences: 0.2% to 17.1%).

CONCLUSION:

While the BRFSS continues to provide invaluable health information at state and local level, it is reassuring to observe consistency in the prevalence estimates of key health indicators of similar caliber between BRFSS and other national surveys.

PMID:
22521996
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.04.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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