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Scand J Work Environ Health. 2013 Mar 1;39(2):178-86. doi: 10.5271/sjweh.3299. Epub 2012 Apr 19.

Rotating night shift work and polymorphism of genes important for the regulation of circadian rhythm.

Author information

1
Department of Toxicology and Carcinogenesis, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, 8 Teresy Street, Lodz, Poland. edyta@imp.lodz.pl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

People living in industrialized societies have developed specific working schedules during the day and at night, including permanent night shifts and rotating night shifts. The aim of this study was to examine the association between circadian polymorphisms and rotating night shift work.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional study comprised 709 nurses and midwives (348 current rotating and 361 current day workers). Genetic polymorphism of selected clock genes BMAL1 (rs2279287), CLOCK (rs1801260), PER1 (rs2735611), PER2 (rs2304672), PER3 (rs10462020), CRY1 (rs8192440), CRY2 (rs10838527, rs10838527) was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays.

RESULTS:

There were no differences in BMAL1, CLOCK, CRY2, PER1, PER2, and PER3 genotypes among nurses and midwives working rotating night and day shifts. The frequency of women with rare CRY1 TT genotype was higher in the group of rotating night shift than day workers (17.0% versus 13.9%, P=0.06). Moreover, CRY1 TT genotype was associated with the total rotating shift-work duration, compared to women rarely working night shifts.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that CRY1 (rs8192440) polymorphism may influence the adaptation to the rotating night shift work among nurses and midwives.

PMID:
22517501
DOI:
10.5271/sjweh.3299
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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