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Curr Opin Anaesthesiol. 2012 Jun;25(3):348-55. doi: 10.1097/ACO.0b013e32835347b2.

Anesthetic management in patients undergoing hyperthermic chemotherapy.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Operative Intensive care Medicine, University of Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany. christoph.raspe@uk-halle.de

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) has become an important therapeutic option for selected patients with peritoneal surface malignancies. This aggressive multimodality treatment is complex, not only regarding surgical technique, but also regarding anesthesia. The present review represents our experience in anesthetic care.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Improved prognosis compared with systemic chemotherapy alone has recently been demonstrated for cytoreductive surgery when combined with intraoperative intracavitary hyperthermic chemotherapy. Anesthetic management of HIPEC is further impacted by these developments. In addition to the ambitious, long-lasting surgery, HIPEC causes significant fluid, blood and protein losses, increased intra-abdominal pressure, systemic hyperthermia, and increased metabolic rate, leading to relevant pathophysiological alterations, and therefore represents a challenge for anesthetist and critical care physicians.

SUMMARY:

Anesthetic management importantly contributes to the containment of the perioperative complications of HIPEC. An appreciation of the technical aspects and physiologic disruptions associated with intra-abdominal HIPEC is critical to ensure effective anesthetic management. Although data on this specialized surgical procedure are scarce, some referral centers have accumulated extensive experience. This article reviews the current knowledge about the anesthesiological and intensive care management of patients undergoing HIPEC. It pinpoints strategies for perioperative monitoring as well as illustrates alterations in hemodynamic, hematopoetic, and fluid hemostasis.

PMID:
22517311
DOI:
10.1097/ACO.0b013e32835347b2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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