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Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2012 Jul;24(7):787-92. doi: 10.1097/MEG.0b013e328353fcbc.

Nonanesthesiologist-administered propofol sedation for colonoscopy is safe and effective: a prospective Spanish study over 1000 consecutive exams.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, Tomelloso General Hospital, Tomelloso, Spain. alucendo@vodafone.es

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS:

Propofol is increasingly being used in sedated colonoscopy. This paper assesses the safety and efficacy of nonanesthesiologist-administered propofol in a large series of colonoscopies.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

A prospective registry of consecutive American Society of Anesthetics (ASA) class I and II outpatients undergoing colonoscopy was carried out. Propofol, administered by a nurse under an endoscopist's supervision, was the sole sedative agent used.

RESULTS:

Of the 1000 patients (563 women/437 men, mean age 57, range 8-89 years) included in the study, 57.4% showed ASA I and 42.6% ASA II characteristics. The cecal intubation rate was 96.9%. 48.2% of the procedures were for therapeutic purposes. The mean propofol dose was 177 mg (range 50-590 mg). Doses correlated inversely with patient age (r=-0.38; P<0.001) and were lower in ASA II patients (P<0.001) and in diagnostic (rather than therapeutic) exams (P<0.001). The average recovery time (from extracting the colonoscope to patient discharge) was 18.6 min (range 4-75) and longer in ASA II patients (P=0.05). A pulse oximetry saturation of less than 90% and a decrease in systolic blood pressure of more than 20 mmHg were observed in 24 (2.4%) and 385 (35.8%) patients, respectively. Both events were more frequent in patients older than 65 years (P<0.05); the latter was more common in ASA II patients.

CONCLUSION:

Colonoscopy under endoscopist-controlled propofol sedation in low-risk patients is safe and effective, allowing for a complete exploration, although patients at least 65 years old and/or classified as ASA II are more likely to present a decrease in blood pressure and have a prolonged recovery time.

PMID:
22517241
DOI:
10.1097/MEG.0b013e328353fcbc
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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