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J Antimicrob Chemother. 2012 Jul;67(7):1769-74. doi: 10.1093/jac/dks118. Epub 2012 Apr 18.

Prevalence of and risk factors associated with faecal carriage of CTX-M β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in rural Thai communities.

Author information

1
Department of Bioinformatics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the prevalence of CTX-M β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and to study the risk factors associated with faecal carriage in asymptomatic rural Thai people.

METHODS:

In all, 417 stool samples were obtained from rural Thai people and screened for extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) using MacConkey agar supplemented with 2 mg/L cefotaxime. Results were confirmed using cefotaxime and ceftazidime with and without clavulanic acid. The bla(CTX-M) genes were identified and genotyped using PCR with bacterial DNA samples. Multivariate analysis was performed to investigate risk factors associated with the faecal carriage of CTX-M producers.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of CTX-M-type ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae was 65.7%. The CTX-M-9 group (60.6%) was dominant, followed by the CTX-M-1 group (38.7%). Most of the bacteria were Escherichia coli (85.4%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (4.7%). Of a total of 234 E. coli strains, 48.7% belonged to phylogenetic group A, 28.6% to group B1, 15.8% to group D and 6.8% to group B2. Most CTX-M producers were susceptible to carbapenems and amikacin, but resistant to tetracycline and gentamicin. In a multivariate logistic regression model, better education status (OR 2.245; 95% CI 1.297-3.884), history of hospitalization (OR 1.643; 95% CI 1.036-2.603) and the use of antibiotics within the last 3 months (OR 1.883; 95% CI 1.221-2.903) were independently associated with faecal carriage.

CONCLUSIONS:

Faecal carriage of CTX-M-type ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae among asymptomatic individuals in rural Thailand remains alarmingly high, and previous antibiotic use and a history of hospitalization may contribute to its dissemination.

PMID:
22514260
DOI:
10.1093/jac/dks118
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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