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Br J Surg. 2012 Jun;99(6):839-47. doi: 10.1002/bjs.8755. Epub 2012 Apr 18.

Comparison of liver transplantation outcomes from adult split liver and circulatory death donors.

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1
Cambridge Transplant Centre, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Adult whole-organ donation after circulatory death (DCD) and 'split' extended right lobe donation after brain death (ERL-DBD) liver transplants are considered marginal, but direct comparison of outcomes has rarely been performed. Such a comparison may rationalize the use of DCD livers, which varies widely between UK centres.

METHODS:

Outcomes for adult ERL-DBD livers and 'controlled' DCD liver transplantations performed at the Cambridge Transplant Centre between January 2004 and December 2010 were compared retrospectively.

RESULTS:

None of the 32 patients in the DCD cohort suffered early graft failure, compared with five of 17 in the ERL-DBD cohort. Reasons for graft failure were hepatic artery thrombosis (3), progressive cholestasis (1) and small-for-size syndrome (1). Early allograft dysfunction occurred in a further five patients in each group. In the DCD group, ischaemic cholangiopathy developed in six patients, resulting in graft failure within the first year in two; the others remained stable. The incidence of biliary anastomotic complications was similar in both groups. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis confirmed superior graft survival in the DCD liver group (93 per cent at 3 years versus 71 per cent in the ERL-DBD cohort; P = 0·047), comparable to that of contemporaneous whole DBD liver transplants (93 per cent at 3 years). Patient survival was similar in all groups.

CONCLUSION:

Graft outcomes of DCD liver transplants were better than those of ERL-DBD liver transplants. Redefining DCD liver criteria and refining donor-recipient selection for ERL-DBD transplants should be further explored.

PMID:
22511247
DOI:
10.1002/bjs.8755
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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