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Vision Res. 2012 Jun 1;62:9-16. doi: 10.1016/j.visres.2012.03.014. Epub 2012 Apr 4.

Aging effect in pattern, motion and cognitive visual evoked potentials.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Králové, Dept. of Pathophysiology, Electrophysiological Laboratory, Charles University in Prague, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic. kuba@lfhk.cuni.cz

Abstract

An electrophysiological study on the effect of aging on the visual pathway and various levels of visual information processing (primary cortex, associate visual motion processing cortex and cognitive cortical areas) was performed. We examined visual evoked potentials (VEPs) to pattern-reversal, motion-onset (translation and radial motion) and visual stimuli with a cognitive task (cognitive VEPs - P300 wave) at luminance of 17 cd/m(2). The most significant age-related change in a group of 150 healthy volunteers (15-85 years of age) was the increase in the P300 wave latency (2 ms per 1 year of age). Delays of the motion-onset VEPs (0.47 ms/year in translation and 0.46 ms/year in radial motion) and the pattern-reversal VEPs (0.26 ms/year) and the reductions of their amplitudes with increasing subject age (primarily in P300) were also found to be significant. The amplitude of the motion-onset VEPs to radial motion remained the most constant parameter with increasing age. Age-related changes were stronger in males. Our results indicate that cognitive VEPs, despite larger variability of their parameters, could be a useful criterion for an objective evaluation of the aging processes within the CNS. Possible differences in aging between the motion-processing system and the form-processing system within the visual pathway might be indicated by the more pronounced delay in the motion-onset VEPs and by their preserved size for radial motion (a biologically significant variant of motion) compared to the changes in pattern-reversal VEPs.

PMID:
22503557
DOI:
10.1016/j.visres.2012.03.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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