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Leg Med (Tokyo). 2012 Jul;14(4):205-8. doi: 10.1016/j.legalmed.2012.02.001. Epub 2012 Apr 12.

Replication study of the association of SNPs in the LHX3-QSOX2 and IGF1 loci with adult height in the Japanese population; wide-ranging comparison of each SNP genotype distribution.

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1
Department of Legal Medicine, Shimane University School of Medicine, 89-1 Enya, Izumo, Shimane 693-8501, Japan.

Abstract

Adult height is a highly heritable trait involving multiple genes. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified that SNP rs12338076 in the LHX3-QSOX2 locus, and rs1457595 and rs17032362 in the IGF1 locus are associated with human height in the Japanese population (Okada et al. (2010)). We performed a replication study to examine the associations between these three SNPs and adult height in the Japanese population based on autopsy cases. However, it was not possible to confirm that all these SNPs influenced adult height in the study population. We first conducted a wide-ranging survey of these three SNPs in the above genes using nine different populations including Asians, Africans and Caucasians, and demonstrated that the genotypes of rs12338076 and rs17032362 were distributed in an ethnicity-dependent manner; even within Asian populations, the genotype distributions of the SNPs differed widely. Although there are differences in height distribution between different populations, possibly due to genetic factors and/or gene-environmental interactions, the contradictory results of the association study and ethnic differences in genotype distribution allow us to assume that these height-related SNPs in the genes may contribute to adult height to a slight extent, at least in the Japanese population. It is anticipated that the present information will be useful for developing a reliable tool for personal identification through elucidation of the genetic basis of human height.

PMID:
22503243
DOI:
10.1016/j.legalmed.2012.02.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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