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PLoS One. 2012;7(4):e33866. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0033866. Epub 2012 Apr 9.

Gender-specific associations of marine n-3 fatty acids and fish consumption with 10-year incidence of stroke.

Author information

1
Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is some evidence that the association of fish and marine fatty acids with stroke risk differs between men and women. We investigated the gender-specific associations of habitual intake of the marine fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and fish on incident stroke in a population-based study in the Netherlands.

METHODS:

We prospectively followed 20,069 men and women, aged 20-65 years, without cardiovascular diseases at baseline. Habitual diet was assessed with a validated 178-item food frequency questionnaire. Incidence of stroke was assessed through linkage with mortality and morbidity registers. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI).

RESULTS:

During 8-13 years of follow-up, 221 strokes occurred. In women, an inverse dose-response relation (P-trend = 0.02) was observed between EPA-DHA intake and incident stroke, with an HR of 0.49 (95% CI: 0.27-0.91) in the top quartile of EPA-DHA (median 225 mg/d) as compared to the bottom quartile (median 36 mg/d). In men, the HR (95%CI) for the top quartile of EPA-DHA intake was 0.87 (0.51-1.48) (P-trend = 0.36). Similar results were observed for fish consumption and stroke incidence.

CONCLUSION:

A higher EPA-DHA and fish intake is related to a lower stroke risk in women, while for men an inverse association could not be demonstrated.

PMID:
22496770
PMCID:
PMC3322144
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0033866
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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