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Trauma Violence Abuse. 2012 Apr;13(2):59-76. doi: 10.1177/1524838012440340. Epub 2012 Apr 9.

Identifying domestic and international sex-trafficking victims during human service provision.

Author information

1
School of Social Work, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. rjmacy@email.unc.edu

Abstract

Children, youth, and adults of both genders are sex trafficked into and throughout the United States every day. Regrettably, little attention has been given to how human service providers might identify the sex-trafficking victims they are likely to encounter. To address this knowledge gap, the authors review 20 documents with the aim of detecting and synthesizing service identification recommendations in the scientific literature, government reports, and documents produced by organizations working with sex-trafficking victims. The review shows consensus regarding identification recommendations, including (a) trafficking indicators, (b) victim interaction strategies, (c) immediate response strategies, and (d) child-specific information. The review also shows consensus regarding screening questions that are important for service providers to use in identifying sex-trafficking victims. These questions relate to the victims' safety, employment, living environment, and travel and immigration status in addition to specific questions used with children and youth. The review results offer human service providers a preliminary set of screening strategies and questions that can be used to identify sex-trafficking victims in the context of human services. Building on the review findings, the authors offer policy and research recommendations.

PMID:
22491971
DOI:
10.1177/1524838012440340
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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