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Cell Metab. 2012 Apr 4;15(4):421-31. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2011.12.019.

G-protein-coupled receptors in intestinal chemosensation.

Author information

1
Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Wellcome Trust/MRC Building, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge, UK. fr222@cam.ac.uk

Abstract

Food intake is detected by the chemical senses of taste and smell and subsequently by chemosensory cells in the gastrointestinal tract that link the composition of ingested foods to feedback circuits controlling gut motility/secretion, appetite, and peripheral nutrient disposal. G-protein-coupled receptors responsive to a range of nutrients and other food components have been identified, and many are localized to intestinal chemosensory cells, eliciting hormonal and neuronal signaling to the brain and periphery. This review examines the role of G-protein-coupled receptors as signaling molecules in the gut, with a particular focus on pathways relevant to appetite and glucose homeostasis.

PMID:
22482725
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2011.12.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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