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BMC Neurosci. 2012 Apr 5;13:38. doi: 10.1186/1471-2202-13-38.

Riluzole neuroprotection in a Parkinson's disease model involves suppression of reactive astrocytosis but not GLT-1 regulation.

Author information

1
King's College London, Wolfson Centre for Age-Related Diseases, Guy's Campus, London SE1 1UL, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Riluzole is a neuroprotective drug used in the treatment of motor neurone disease. Recent evidence suggests that riluzole can up-regulate the expression and activity of the astrocyte glutamate transporter, GLT-1. Given that regulation of glutamate transport is predicted to be neuroprotective in Parkinson's disease, we tested the effect of riluzole in parkinsonian rats which had received a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine injection into the median forebrain bundle.

RESULTS:

Rats were treated with intraperitoneal riluzole (4 mg/kg or 8 mg/kg), 1 hour before the lesion then once daily for seven days. Riluzole produced a modest but significant attenuation of dopamine neurone degeneration, assessed by suppression of amphetamine-induced rotations, preservation of tyrosine hydroxylase positive neuronal cell bodies in the substantia nigra pars compacta and attenuation of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase protein loss. Seven days after 6-hydroxydopamine lesion, reactive astrocytosis was observed in the striatum, as determined by increases in expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, however the glutamate transporter, GLT-1, which is also expressed in astrocytes was not regulated by the lesion.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results confirm that riluzole is a neuroprotective agent in a rodent model of parkinson's disease. Riluzole administration did not regulate GLT-1 levels but significantly reduced GFAP levels, in the lesioned striatum. Riluzole suppression of reactive astrocytosis is an intriguing finding which might contribute to the neuroprotective effects of this drug.

PMID:
22480308
PMCID:
PMC3349538
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2202-13-38
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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