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Yonsei Med J. 2012 May;53(3):565-70. doi: 10.3349/ymj.2012.53.3.565.

Prognostic factors for endotracheal silicone stenting in the management of inoperable post-intubation tracheal stenosis.

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1
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Stenting has been developed to deal with airway stenosis and is applicable in patients with post-intubation tracheal stenosis (PITS) in whom surgery would not be indicated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic factors in inoperable patients in whom a silicone stent was inserted due to PITS.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We retrospectively evaluated 55 PITS patients undergoing silicone stenting between January 2001 and December 2009.

RESULTS:

Silicone stent was inserted to narrowed trachea after the combination of pre-dilatation including laser cauterization, mechanical bougienation and ballooning. Following airway stabilization, the stent could be removed successfully in 40% (22/55) of the patients after median 12 months of stenting. However, in 60% (33/55) of patients, the stent could not be removed successfully and surgical management was needed after initial stabilization. Multivariate analysis revealed that the stent could be successfully removed more frequently in those who do not have cardiovascular disease [odds ratio (OR)=12.195; p=0.036] and the intervention was performed within 6 months after intubation (OR=13.029; p=0.031).

CONCLUSION:

Among those patients undergoing silicone stenting due to PITS, the stent could be successfully removed when patients do not have cardiovascular disease and stented within 6 months after intubation.

PMID:
22477001
PMCID:
PMC3343434
DOI:
10.3349/ymj.2012.53.3.565
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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