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Retina. 2012 Oct;32(9):1862-7.

Time course of changes in aqueous flare intensity after vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate the time course of changes in aqueous flare intensity after vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RD) and to determine the clinical factors related to an increase in aqueous flare.

METHODS:

The present study included 22 unilateral patients with RD undergoing primary 20-gauge vitrectomy. Aqueous flare intensity was measured preoperatively and at 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, and 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively using the laser flare meter.

RESULTS:

Before vitrectomy, aqueous flare intensity was significantly higher in eyes with RD than in contralateral normal eyes. Vitrectomy increased aqueous flare intensity, and the peak was observed at the first postoperative week. Aqueous flare intensity decreased to a stable level at 3 months postoperatively but remained significantly higher than that of contralateral and preoperative eyes throughout the observation period. Clinical factors that were found to be significantly correlated with an increase in aqueous flare intensity included 1) before the surgical procedure: extent of RD and intraocular pressure, and 2) 3 months postoperatively: size of retinal breaks, number of laser photocoagulation spots, operation time, and performance of combined cataract surgery. Multiple regression analysis revealed that aqueous flare intensity at 3 months postoperatively had significant correlation with the size of retinal breaks (P < 0.005) and the number of laser photocoagulation spots (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Aqueous flare intensity after vitrectomy for RD decreased to a stable level at 3 months postoperatively but remained significantly higher than the normal level. The size of retinal breaks and the degree of surgical invasion were associated with the increase in aqueous flare.

PMID:
22466487
DOI:
10.1097/IAE.0b013e3182456f38
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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