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Pediatr Phys Ther. 2012 Summer;24(2):141-8. doi: 10.1097/PEP.0b013e31824c764b.

Short-term, early intensive power mobility training: case report of an infant at risk for cerebral palsy.

Author information

1
Infant Motor Behavior Laboratory, Department of Physical Therapy and Biomechanics and Movement Sciences Program, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, USA. CLBR@Udel.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This case report describes the feasibility of quantifying short-term, intensive power mobility training for an infant soon after a diagnosis of cerebral palsy.

KEY POINTS:

An 11-month-old infant with significant mobility impairments and her parents were filmed during 14 consecutive daily training sessions. The infant moved the power chair with hand-over-hand assistance and performed open exploration of the joystick and toys. Mobility measures, coded from video, were compared across training. Frequency and combination of looking at and interacting with the joystick, percentage of time of moving independently, and average percentage of success in moving when prompted, all increased across the training.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:

Quantifying short-term, intensive power mobility training for infants is feasible and may have yielded positive short-term effects for this infant. The "who," "when," and "how" of early power mobility training, as well as the critical need for paradigm shifts in power mobility training, are discussed.

PMID:
22466381
PMCID:
PMC3319352
DOI:
10.1097/PEP.0b013e31824c764b
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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