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Prog Retin Eye Res. 2012 Jul;31(4):303-15. doi: 10.1016/j.preteyeres.2012.03.002. Epub 2012 Mar 21.

Lutein: more than just a filter for blue light.

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1
University Eye Clinic Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands. aize.kijlstra@wur.nl

Abstract

Lutein is concentrated in the primate retina, where together with zeaxanthin it forms the macular pigment. Traditionally lutein is characterized by its blue light filtering and anti-oxidant properties. Eliminating lutein from the diet of experimental animals results in early degenerative signs in the retina while patients with an acquired condition of macular pigment loss (Macular Telangiectasia) show serious visual handicap indicating the importance of macular pigment. Whether lutein intake reduces the risk of age related macular degeneration (AMD) or cataract formation is currently a strong matter of debate and abundant research is carried out to unravel the biological properties of the lutein molecule. SR-B1 has recently been identified as a lutein binding protein in the retina and this same receptor plays a role in the selective uptake in the gut. In the blood lutein is transported via high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Genes controlling SR-B1 and HDL levels predispose to AMD which supports the involvement of cholesterol/lutein transport pathways. Apart from beneficial effects of lutein intake on various visual function tests, recent findings show that lutein can affect immune responses and inflammation. Lutein diminishes the expression of various ocular inflammation models including endotoxin induced uveitis, laser induced choroidal neovascularization, streptozotocin induced diabetes and experimental retinal ischemia and reperfusion. In vitro studies show that lutein suppresses NF kappa-B activation as well as the expression of iNOS and COX-2. Since AMD has features of a chronic low-grade systemic inflammatory response, attention to the exact role of lutein in this disease has shifted from a local effect in the eye towards a possible systemic anti-inflammatory function.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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